Supercontinuum Sources

85 Supercontinuum Sources from 15 manufacturers listed on GoPhotonics

Supercontinuum Sources are special types of lasers or light sources that emit an extremely wide and continuous spectrum of light. Supercontinuum Sources from the leading manufacturers are listed below. Use the filters to narrow down on products based on your requirements. Download datasheets and request quotes for products that you find interesting. Your inquiry will be directed to the manufacturer and their distributors in your region.

Description: 400 nm - 2000 nm, Supercontinuum Source for Spectroscopy Applications
Pulse Width:
20 fs
Spectral Range:
400 to 2000 nm
Repetition Rate:
100 MHz
Fiber Type:
Free Space
Spectrum Band:
NIR
Package Type:
Portable
Oscillation Mode:
Pulsed
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Description: 550 nm - 1750 nm, Supercontinuum Source for STED Microscopy Applications
Pulse Width:
>100 ps
Repetition Rate:
0.1 to 20 MHz
Fiber Type:
Free space, collimated
Spectrum Band:
VIS-NIR
Package Type:
Benchtop / Rackmount
Oscillation Mode:
Pulsed
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Description: 750 to 1300 nm FC/APC Fiber-Coupled 3 W Average Power MIR Supercontinnum Source
Output Power:
3 W
Pulse Width:
<200 fs
Spectral Range:
750 to 1300 nm
Repetition Rate:
100 MHz
Fiber Type:
Fiber-Coupled
Spectrum Band:
MIR
Beam Mode:
Polarization Maintaining
Package Type:
Pigtailed Module
Visible Power:
>40 µW (Dispersive wave)
Pulse Energy:
150 pJ to 1 nJ
Fiber Connectors:
FC/APC
Oscillation Mode:
Pulsed
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Description: 1300 to 2000 nm NIR Pulsed Single Mode Supercontinuum Source
Output Power:
50 mW
Pulse Width:
1 ps
Spectral Range:
1300 to 2000 nm (Spectral distribution)
Repetition Rate:
50 MHz
Fiber Type:
Fiber Laser
Spectrum Band:
NIR
Beam Mode:
Single Mode
Package Type:
Benchtop / Rackmount
Fiber Connectors:
FC/APC
Oscillation Mode:
Pulsed
Supply Voltage (AC):
100 to 240 VAC, 50 to 60 Hz
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Description: 1.3 to 4.5 µm MIR Pulsed Single Mode Supercontinuum Source
Output Power:
110 to 500 mW
Spectral Range:
1.3 to 4.5 µm
Repetition Rate:
48 to 52 MHz
Fiber Type:
Fiber Laser
Spectrum Band:
MIR
Beam Mode:
Single Mode
Package Type:
Benchtop / Rackmount
Beam Diameter:
5.5 mm
Interface:
USB
Oscillation Mode:
Pulsed
Supply Voltage (AC):
100 to 240 VAC, 50 to 60 Hz
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Description: 1530 nm - 1565 nm, Microprocessor Controlled Supercontinuum Source
Output Power:
17 dBm
Spectral Range:
1530 to 1565 nm
Fiber Type:
Fiber Laser
Spectrum Band:
NIR
Beam Mode:
Single Mode
Package Type:
Pigtailed Module
Control Mode:
AOPC (Constant Output Power Control), ACC (Constan...
DC Supply Voltage:
5 V
Fiber Connectors:
FC/APC
Interface:
RS-232, UART
Oscillation Mode:
CW
Fiber Length:
1 m
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Description: 900 nm - 2600 nm, NIR Supercontinuum Source for Metrology Applications
Output Power:
>400 mW
Pulse Width:
40 ps
Repetition Rate:
2 MHz
Fiber Type:
Fiber Laser
Spectrum Band:
NIR, IR
Beam Mode:
Single Mode
Package Type:
Benchtop / Rackmount
Fiber Connectors:
FC/APC
Interface:
Front panel and USB
Oscillation Mode:
Pulsed
Supply Voltage (AC):
100 to 240 VAC, 50 to 60 Hz
Fiber Length:
1 m
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Description: 450 nm - 2300 nm, Supercontinuum Fiber Laser Source for Imaging Applications
Output Power:
>3 W
Pulse Width:
<10 ps
Spectral Range:
450 to 750 nm
Repetition Rate:
80 MHz
Fiber Type:
Fiber Laser
Spectrum Band:
VIS-NIR
Beam Mode:
Single Mode, Multi-Mode
Package Type:
Benchtop / Rackmount
Visible Power:
150 mW
Beam Diameter:
<4 mm
Fiber Connectors:
FC/PC, FC/APC
Interface:
USB
Oscillation Mode:
Pulsed
RF Connector:
SMA
Supply Voltage (AC):
110 to 220 VAC, 50 to 60 Hz
Fiber Length:
1 m
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Description: 430 nm - 2400 nm, Supercontinuum Source for Microscopy Applications
Output Power:
>8 W (total)
Pulse Width:
100 ps
Spectral Range:
430 to 2400 nm
Repetition Rate:
10 kHz to 80 MHz
Fiber Type:
Fiber Laser
Spectrum Band:
UV-VIS-NIR
Beam Mode:
Single Mode
Package Type:
System
Visible Power:
>1000 mW
Beam Diameter:
2 mm
Pulse Energy:
>1 µJ
DC Supply Voltage:
0 to 1 V
Oscillation Mode:
Pulsed
RF Connector:
SMA
Supply Voltage (AC):
100 to 240 VAC, 50 to 60 Hz
Fiber Length:
1.5 m
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Description: 350 nm - 2400 nm, White Light Supercontinuum Source for Imaging Applications
Output Power:
5.5 W
Spectral Range:
400 to 2400 nm
Repetition Rate:
0.15 to 78 MHz
Fiber Type:
Fiber Laser
Spectrum Band:
UV-VIS-NIR
Beam Mode:
Single Mode
Package Type:
System
Visible Power:
1.5 W
Beam Diameter:
1 to 3 mm
Interface:
USB 2.0, RS-232, Ethernet
Oscillation Mode:
Pulsed
Supply Voltage (AC):
100 to 240 VAC, 50 to 60 Hz
Fiber Length:
1.5 m
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1 - 10 of 85 Supercontinuum Sources

What are Supercontinuum Sources?

A supercontinuum source is a specialized laser that emit an exceptionally broad and continuous spectrum of light, extending beyond the visible light spectrum. Supercontinuum is a phenomenon in optics where a broad and continuous spectrum of light is generated through a nonlinear process. The name "supercontinuum" is derived from the fact that the generated spectrum covers a "super" or extremely broad continuum of wavelengths. Operating as a compact light source, supercontinuum source covers a wide spectrum from 400nm to 2400nm, similar to sunlight. It was first observed in 1970 by Alfano and Shapiro. Since then, supercontinuum sources have found applications in diverse fields such as spectroscopy, microscopy, telecommunications, and frequency metrology, owing to their ability to provide a versatile and unique light source.

Supercontinuum generation (SCG) is a process that is produced by ultra-short, high-power pulses, typically in the picosecond range or even shorter, propagating through solid, liquid, or gaseous nonlinear media. These intense laser pulses trigger various nonlinear phenomena like stimulated Raman scattering, self-phase modulation, cross-phase modulation, and four-wave mixing. The spectrum's breadth and its specific spectral position depend on factors such as the pump's power and type, along with the nonlinear and dispersion traits of the medium.

It is a nonlinear phenomenon that remarkably widens light spectra by utilizing optical nonlinearities, enabling the conversion of incoming light into diverse frequencies. This process involves transforming laser light into an immensely broad spectral range. Such spectral broadening substantially reduces temporal coherence while generally maintaining a high level of spatial coherence.

 Working of Supercontinuum Sources

 

Supercontinuum sources typically start with the generation of an intense laser pulse. This pulse is often generated by a mode-locked laser, producing short and intense bursts of light. The laser pulse is then directed through a nonlinear medium. This medium is often a specially designed optical fiber, though other nonlinear crystals or gases can also be used. As the intense laser pulse propagates through the nonlinear medium, various nonlinear optical effects come into play. Some of the key effects include:

  • Self-Phase Modulation (SPM): The intensity-dependent refractive index of the medium causes a phase shift in different parts of the pulse which then leads to spectral broadening.
  • Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS): Photon energy is transferred to vibrational modes of the medium that results in additional spectral components.
  • Four-Wave Mixing (FWM): Interactions between different spectral components of the pulse generate new frequencies.

These nonlinear effects collectively broaden the spectral bandwidth of the initial laser pulse significantly resulting in a supercontinuum. Such sources often exhibit low temporal coherence which indicates that different wavelengths are not correlated over time. However, they can maintain high spatial coherence which allows for focused and directional emission.

An alternative method involves transmitting pulses with lower energy through an optical fiber with a waveguide structure, enabling extended propagation with a small effective mode area. Photonic crystal fibers, known for unconventional chromatic dispersion characteristics, are particularly intriguing in this regard. These fibers facilitate a robust nonlinear interaction over a considerable length, producing remarkably broad spectra, often referred to as a "laser rainbow."

In the generation of supercontinuum, optical fibers are commonly employed. Due to strong mode confinement, photonic crystal fibers are often preferred for their customizable chromatic dispersion properties and frequently enhanced nonlinearity. Additionally, some less common solutions include the use of tapered fibers, offering highly effective nonlinear interactions over short lengths, and demonstrations where the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber were filled with either a gas (potentially Raman-active) or a highly nonlinear liquid, such as carbon tetrachloride or toluene.

Supercontinuum generation in fibers depends on factors like chromatic dispersion, fiber length, pulse duration, peak power, and pump wavelength. With femtosecond pulses, self-phase modulation dominates, causing spectral broadening. In anomalous dispersion, soliton (pulses with a certain balance of nonlinear and dispersive effects) dynamics, including soliton fission, can occur. 

Applications of Supercontinuum sources

  • Spectroscopy: Supercontinuum lasers propelled research in inverse Raman scattering, time-resolved absorption and excitation spectroscopy, and primary vision processes. With their expansive wavelength coverage, these lasers facilitate the simultaneous detection of multiple species.
  • Microscopy: In contrast to conventional wide-field microscopy, confocal and multiphoton microscopies necessitate the use of multiple lasers to construct 3D specimen images. This demand relies on spatially coherent sources to generate small, diffraction-limited spots while retaining high resolution. This complexity and increased cost in microscopy can be mitigated by employing supercontinuum lasers, which offer broad spectral coverage while maintaining the properties of a monochromatic laser.
  • Telecommunications: A pivotal application of supercontinuum lasers lies in serving as multi-wavelength sources crucial for wavelength-division-multiplexing systems. These systems enable the transmission of multiple information channels through the same optical fiber. Besides serving as excellent broadband sources, supercontinuum lasers, with their ultrashort pulses, underpin the foundation of modern telecommunication systems.
  • Optical Fiber Characterization: Supercontinuum lasers play a vital role in applications like optical fiber characterization. As novel optical fibers with diverse properties emerge for specific applications and technologies, characterizing these fibers efficiently and cost-effectively finds resolution with supercontinuum lasers. They enable measuring the attenuation and dispersion properties at specific wavelengths using a single instrument.
  • Frequency Combs: Integral to optical metrology applications, frequency combs function as high-precision frequency "rulers," manifesting as a spectrum of light with equally separated frequency peaks. Utilizing supercontinuum sources is instrumental in achieving this, given their wide light spectrum spanning at least one optical octave.
  • Supercontinuum Light Sources in Biophotonics: In the realm of biophotonics, encompassing optical imaging, laser surgery, and light therapy, manipulating the light source proves preferable over the patient, sample, or biological matter. Supercontinuum fiber lasers addressed the challenge of employing multiple laser sources for various experiments. They enabled diverse experiments and tests using a singular source. Additionally, the evolution of supercontinuum lasers into the ultraviolet UV and infrared IR ranges presented outstanding sources for numerous biomedical applications. Optical coherence tomography (OCT), akin to ultrasound but noninvasive for imaging tissue, increasingly relies on low-noise supercontinuum lasers to capture higher-quality images.

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