CCD Image Sensors

192 CCD Image Sensors from 5 manufacturers listed on GoPhotonics

A CCD (charge-coupled device) Image Sensor is a type of electronic device that converts optical images into electronic signals. Image Sensors from the leading manufacturers are listed below. Use the filters to narrow down on products based on your requirement. Download datasheets and request quotes for products that you find interesting. Your inquiry will be directed to the manufacturer and their distributors in your region.

Description: 600 DPI CCD Linear Image Sensor for Laser Printers & Color Copier Applications
Sensor Type:
Linear Image Sensors
Resolution:
600 DPI
Chroma:
Color, Red, Green, Blue
Package:
CLCC
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Description: 1 MP 2.9 fps Ceramic Package Back Illuminated, Full Frame Sensors
Sensor Type:
Back Illuminated Sensors, Full Frame Sensors
Spectral Range:
200 to 1060 nm
Pixels:
1 MP
Frame Rate:
2.9 fps
Resolution:
2048(H) x 512(V)
Full Well Capacity:
150 ke- (Non-inverted), 100 ke- (Advanced Inverted...
Chroma:
Ultraviolet, Visible, Near-Infrared
Dynamic Range:
33333:1
Package:
Ceramic
Readout Noise:
3 e-rms
Applications:
Spectroscopy, Scientific Imaging, TDI Operation
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Description: 4.26 Megapixel Area CCD Image Sensor for Scientific & Industrial Applications
Sensor Type:
Back Illuminated Sensors, Frame Transfer Sensors
Pixels:
4.26 MP
Resolution:
2064(H) x 2064(V)
Full Well Capacity:
150 to 200 ke-
Chroma:
Ultraviolet, Visible, Near-Infrared
Package:
Multi-Pinned Phase
Readout Noise:
2 to 4 e-rms
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Description: 3 Megapixel CCD Image Sensor for Security Applications
Sensor Type:
Area Image Sensors
Pixels:
2980 k
Frame Rate:
17 fps
Resolution:
1984 (H) x 1504 (V)
Chroma:
Monochrome, B/W
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Description: 0.48 MP VIS-NIR Linear Image Sensors
Sensor Type:
Linear Image Sensors
Spectral Range:
400 to 1000 nm
Pixels:
0.48 MP
Resolution:
450(H) x 1060(V)
Chroma:
Visible, Near-Infrared
Package:
PCB
Readout Noise:
25 e-
Applications:
Ground Astronomy
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Sensor Type:
Linear Image Sensor
Resolution:
600 DPI
Chroma:
Color, B/W
Package:
22 pin CLCC
Applications:
Color scanners / Laser printers
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Description: 3.85 Megapixel Frame Transfer CCD Image Sensor for Scientific Applications
Sensor Type:
Frame Transfer Sensors, Space Qualified Sensor
Pixels:
1.86 MP
Resolution:
1380(H) x 1350(V)
Chroma:
Ultraviolet, Visible, Near-Infrared
Readout Noise:
40 rms e-
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Description: 16.78 MP UV-VIS-NIR Back Illuminated, Frame Transfer Sensors
Sensor Type:
Back Illuminated Sensors, Frame Transfer Sensors
Pixels:
16.78 MP
Resolution:
4096(H) x 4096(V)
Full Well Capacity:
150 to 300 ke-
Chroma:
Ultraviolet, Visible, Near-Infrared
Package:
Multi-Pinned Phase
Readout Noise:
2.5 to 3.5 e-rms
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Sensor Type:
Area Image Sensors
Pixels:
610 k
Resolution:
976 (H) x 582 (V)
Chroma:
Color
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Description: 193 to 400 nm UV-VIS Back Illuminated Sensors
Sensor Type:
Back Illuminated Sensors, Space Qualified Sensor
Spectral Range:
193 to 400 nm
Pixels:
1.9 MP
Resolution:
1404(H) x 1350(V)
Chroma:
Ultraviolet, Visible
Applications:
hyperspectral imaging
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Description: 9.325 µm x 9.325 µm, CCD Linear Image Sensor for Color Scanner Applications
Sensor Type:
Linear Image Sensor
Resolution:
600 DPI
Chroma:
Color
Dynamic Range:
50,000:1
Package:
68-pin CERDIP
Applications:
Color scanners / Photocopiers
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Description: 1 MP 9.5 fps DIL / DIP / Thru-Hole Peltier Package Back Illuminated, Frame Transfer Sensors
Sensor Type:
Back Illuminated Sensors, Frame Transfer Sensors
Spectral Range:
200 to 1100 nm
Pixels:
1 MP
Frame Rate:
9.5 fps
Resolution:
1024(H) x 1024(V)
Full Well Capacity:
120 ke- (Non-inverted), 100 ke- (Advanced Inverted...
Chroma:
Ultraviolet, Visible, Near-Infrared
Dynamic Range:
50000:1
Package:
DIP / DIL / Thru-Hole, Peltier
Readout Noise:
2 e- rms
Applications:
Spectroscopy, Scientific imaging, Medical Imaging
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Description: 4.19 MP UV-VIS-NIR Back Illuminated, Frame Transfer Sensors
Sensor Type:
Back Illuminated Sensors, Frame Transfer Sensors
Pixels:
4.19 MP
Resolution:
2048(H) x 2048(V)
Full Well Capacity:
150 ke-
Chroma:
Ultraviolet, Visible, Near-Infrared
Readout Noise:
<5 e-rms
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Description: 25 fps High-Sensitivity Image Sensors for Security Usage
Sensor Type:
Area Image Sensors
Pixels:
8290 k
Frame Rate:
25 fps
Resolution:
3320 (H) x 2496 (V)
Chroma:
Monochrome, B/W
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Description: 400 to 700 nm VIS Linear Image Sensors
Sensor Type:
Linear Image Sensors
Spectral Range:
400 to 700 nm
Pixels:
0.79 MP
Resolution:
12288(H) x 64(V)
Chroma:
Visible
Applications:
Earth Observation Imaging & Living Planet Sciences
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1 - 15 of 192 CCD Image Sensors

What is a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) Image Sensor?

A Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) image sensor is a semiconductor device used in digital cameras, camcorders, and various imaging applications to capture and convert optical images into electronic signals. It was invented in 1969 by Willard Boyle and George E. Smith at Bell Laboratories. A CCD is a very sensitive tool for detecting light. CCD image sensors operate based on the principle of charge-coupling and photon-to-electron conversion. Charge-coupling is a process by which electrons is transferred from one pixel to another pixel within the sensor. A CCD sensor is a type of image sensor that uses this technology to shift and read out the charges in the light-sensitive pixels. 


It is divided into many small light-sensitive areas called pixels. These pixels work together to create an image. When a photon hits one of these pixels, it turns into one or more electrons. The more electrons collected, the brighter that pixel is in the image. When a CCD is read, the electrons in each pixel are measured to recreate the scene. The speed at which the sensor can move charge from one pixel per second is called the pixel clock frequency. CCDs typically work at frequencies of around 25 MHz to 50 MHz.

Working of CCD Image Sensor


CCD sensors consist of an array of tiny light-sensitive elements called pixels. Each pixel can detect and store the amount of light it receives. When photons strike the pixels, they generate electrons in proportion to the intensity of the light. After the pixels collect electrons, these charges are transferred from one pixel to another within the sensor using a process called charge-coupling. It is a mechanism that allows CCD sensors to capture, accumulate, and transport the charge generated by incident photons, ultimately leading to the creation of a digital image.

This transfer occurs sequentially across rows and columns of pixels. In a row wise transfer, the photoelectrons generated by each pixel in a particular row are shifted to the adjacent pixel in the same row. This is achieved by applying appropriate voltages to the electrodes beneath the pixel array. Row-wise transfer ensures that all the charge accumulated in a row is moved together in a synchronized manner.

After the charge has been shifted along each row, it needs to be transferred column-wise to a designated readout area. Column-wise transfer involves moving the charge from the last pixel in a row to the first pixel in the next row, allowing the charges from each row to be funneled towards the readout electronics. This process is critical to ensure that the charge from all pixels can be read efficiently and without overlap. 

Once the charge has been shifted across the entire sensor to a designated readout area, it is ready to be read. A specialized circuitry reads the accumulated charge in each pixel one by one. This involves measuring the quantity of charge in each pixel and converting it into a digital value. This conversion process is done with high precision and results in a digital representation of the intensity of light that hits each pixel. 

The digital values obtained from the CCD sensor are typically sent to an image processor or a digital signal processor (DSP). Here, various operations such as color correction, white balance adjustment, and noise reduction are performed to enhance the quality of the image. The processed digital image can be stored on a memory card or displayed on a screen. In the case of digital cameras, it can also be compressed to save storage space.

Key Parameters of CCD Image Sensor

  • Quantum Efficiency (QE): QE measures how effectively a CCD sensor can convert incoming photons into electrical charge. It is represented as a percentage and indicates the sensor's sensitivity to different wavelengths of light. Higher QE values indicate better sensitivity and higher light-gathering capability.
  • Wavelength Range: Wavelength range refers to the spectrum of light wavelengths that a CCD sensor can detect effectively. It defines the range of colors or electromagnetic waves that the sensor can capture. The specific wavelength range can vary depending on the sensor's design and application.
  • Dynamic Range: The dynamic range of a CCD sensor represents the span between the minimum and maximum light intensities it can capture while maintaining image quality. A higher dynamic range allows the sensor to capture both bright and dark areas in an image with detail, avoiding overexposed or underexposed regions.
  • Linearity: Linearity measures how accurately the CCD sensor responds to changes in light intensity. A linear sensor produces a response that is directly proportional to the amount of light it receives, making it easier to obtain accurate and consistent image data.
  • Noise: Noise in CCD sensors refers to unwanted variations in the captured image that can degrade image quality. There are various types of noise, including thermal noise, shot noise, and readout noise. Reducing noise is essential to achieve clear and detailed images.
  • Dark Current: Dark current is the unwanted, spontaneous generation of electrical charge within the CCD sensor even in the absence of external light or photons. It can create unwanted signals in the image and is typically more pronounced at higher temperatures. Dark current is a critical parameter to control, especially in long-exposure applications.
  • Readout Noise: Readout noise is the inherent noise introduced during the process of transferring and reading the charge accumulated in each pixel. Lower readout noise results in cleaner and more accurate image data, particularly in low-light conditions.
  • Power: The power consumption of a CCD sensor is crucial, especially in applications where energy efficiency is essential. Lower power consumption can extend the sensor's battery life and reduce heat generation, which can impact sensor performance.

Advantages of CCD Image Sensor

  • Increased sensitivity and reduced noise because they make better use of their surface area (higher fill factor)
  • Fewer faulty pixels due to their simpler structure
  • Improved image consistency due to the central A/D converter

Disadvantages of CCD Image Sensor

  • Slower data retrieval, as only a single central A/D converter digitizes the information.
  • No direct access to individual pixels, unlike CMOS sensors, because CCD sensors must be read sequentially.
  • Increased camera complexity due to the need for additional electronics, resulting in larger and costlier cameras.
  • Greater energy consumption for the entire camera.
  • More risk of smearing and blooming effects when overexposing compared to CMOS sensors.

Applications of CCD Image Sensor

Charge-Coupled Device image sensors are widely used in various applications due to their excellent image quality and sensitivity. One prominent application is in digital cameras and camcorders. CCD sensors are known for their ability to capture high-quality images with low noise, making them suitable for professional photography and videography. They offer superior color accuracy and dynamic range, making them ideal for capturing fine details and vibrant colors in a wide range of lighting conditions.

CCD sensors are also extensively employed in astronomy. Telescopes and observatories often use CCD cameras to capture high-resolution images of celestial objects. These sensors can detect faint signals from distant stars and galaxies, making them invaluable tools for astronomical research. They provide astronomers with the ability to create stunning images of the night sky and conduct important scientific observations.

Also, CCD sensors find applications in medical imaging, particularly in devices like endoscopes and microscopy systems. Their high sensitivity and low noise characteristics enable the visualization of intricate biological structures with exceptional clarity. CCD image sensors have played a crucial role in advancing medical diagnostics and research by providing detailed images for accurate diagnosis and analysis.

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